Transcultural Teacups and The Inbetweenness of Things

I’m very excited to say that The Inbetweenness of Things book was released last month! This volume comes from a conference on the topic of material culture mediated through movement around the world; Lisa Truong and I participated in the symposium

Transcultural Teacups and The Inbetweenness of Things

I’m very excited to say that The Inbetweenness of Things book was released last month! This volume comes from a conference on the topic of material culture mediated through movement around the world; Lisa Truong and I participated in the symposium

“Negotiating Sovereignty”

Sarah Nickel and I are delighted to have an article out in the new special issue of BC Studies. We were lucky enough to work with Laura Ishiguro, who guest edited this issue on Histories of Settler Colonialism, and with Graeme

“Negotiating Sovereignty”

Sarah Nickel and I are delighted to have an article out in the new special issue of BC Studies. We were lucky enough to work with Laura Ishiguro, who guest edited this issue on Histories of Settler Colonialism, and with Graeme

Letter to BuzzFeed about Edward Curtis and “A Disappearing Culture”

What follows is a letter I wrote to BuzzFeed staff regarding a post by Gabriel Sanchez about Edward S. Curtis’ photographs. I was compelled to write directly to Ben Smith (Editor in Chief), Doree Shafrir (Executive Editor) and Sanchez himself

Letter to BuzzFeed about Edward Curtis and “A Disappearing Culture”

What follows is a letter I wrote to BuzzFeed staff regarding a post by Gabriel Sanchez about Edward S. Curtis’ photographs. I was compelled to write directly to Ben Smith (Editor in Chief), Doree Shafrir (Executive Editor) and Sanchez himself

Clio’s Current post: Historicizing Tsilhqot’in

Recently I had the opportunity to write a post for Clio’s Current, a great new(-ish) Canadian history blog that launched just over a year ago. Following the blog’s mandate of exploring “current affairs through historical perspectives,” I decided to tackle

Clio’s Current post: Historicizing Tsilhqot’in

Recently I had the opportunity to write a post for Clio’s Current, a great new(-ish) Canadian history blog that launched just over a year ago. Following the blog’s mandate of exploring “current affairs through historical perspectives,” I decided to tackle

CHA Journal Prize

At this year’s annual meeting of the Canadian Historical Association, I was honoured to receive the Journal Prize for the best article in this years’ issues of the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association/Revue de la Société historique du Canada.

CHA Journal Prize

At this year’s annual meeting of the Canadian Historical Association, I was honoured to receive the Journal Prize for the best article in this years’ issues of the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association/Revue de la Société historique du Canada.

Author's image, courtesy of Sto:lo Archives

A 1976 Comic on Stó:lō Land Claims

Last month, Stacy Nation-Knapper, a member of the editorial board for the Champlain Society’s publication Findings/Trouvailles and a PhD candidate in History at York, asked if I would contribute something to Findings/Trouvailles. It is an exciting new online publication geared

Author's image, courtesy of Sto:lo Archives

A 1976 Comic on Stó:lō Land Claims

Last month, Stacy Nation-Knapper, a member of the editorial board for the Champlain Society’s publication Findings/Trouvailles and a PhD candidate in History at York, asked if I would contribute something to Findings/Trouvailles. It is an exciting new online publication geared

Doris Antony, via Wikimedia Commons

THEN/HiER blog: Family histories in the colonial classroom

This post for The History Education Network/Histoire et Education en Reseau focuses on how teaching histories of colonialism can be made more affective/effective if we harness the existing significance people attach to their own family histories. Click the link to

Doris Antony, via Wikimedia Commons

THEN/HiER blog: Family histories in the colonial classroom

This post for The History Education Network/Histoire et Education en Reseau focuses on how teaching histories of colonialism can be made more affective/effective if we harness the existing significance people attach to their own family histories. Click the link to